Russian Unicorn Original Song


We Could Shoot A Russian Unicorn
We could shoot a Russian unicorn ."I got a porcupine called 'Zazoom' He leaves his scent on people's graves." -- "Russian Unicorn"You know the Kuleshov Effect, illustrated by the famous Soviet montage experiment in which an actor's performance seems to change, depending on whatever image (a bowl of soup, a child in a casket, a beautiful woman) appears before identical footage of his face in close-up. Performances in the movies only begin with what the actor does on the set. They are created and re-created every step of the way, from editing to final sound design and mixing (effects, looping, punching, music, etc.). There's also what I would propose we call the "Russian Unicorn Effect," after the amazing music video parody by Bad Lip Reading.OK, it's already kind of got a name -- the McGurk effect -- and it was "discovered" in 1976 by cognitive psychologist Harry McGurk and his research assistant John MacDonald -- and it explains how sounds can change perceptions of images and vice-versa.I saw and heard the parody above ("Russian Unicorn") a few months ago, which led me to check out the original Michael Bublé video ("Haven't Met You Yet"), below. I could not believe the difference. Try it yourself -- first the parody, then the original here (embedding disabled, unfortunately). www.rogerebert.com
We Could Shoot A Russian Unicorn
We could shoot a Russian unicorn ."I got a porcupine called 'Zazoom' He leaves his scent on people's graves." -- "Russian Unicorn"You know the Kuleshov Effect, illustrated by the famous Soviet montage experiment in which an actor's performance seems to change, depending on whatever image (a bowl of soup, a child in a casket, a beautiful woman) appears before identical footage of his face in close-up. Performances in the movies only begin with what the actor does on the set. They are created and re-created every step of the way, from editing to final sound design and mixing (effects, looping, punching, music, etc.). There's also what I would propose we call the "Russian Unicorn Effect," after the amazing music video parody by Bad Lip Reading.OK, it's already kind of got a name -- the McGurk effect -- and it was "discovered" in 1976 by cognitive psychologist Harry McGurk and his research assistant John MacDonald -- and it explains how sounds can change perceptions of images and vice-versa.I saw and heard the parody above ("Russian Unicorn") a few months ago, which led me to check out the original Michael Bublé video ("Haven't Met You Yet"), below. I could not believe the difference. Try it yourself -- first the parody, then the original here (embedding disabled, unfortunately). www.rogerebert.com
Russian Unicorn
Russian Unicorn . Check out a fresh (lip dubbed) look at Michael Buble's video for “Haven’t Met You Yet”. brocouncil.com
Bad Lip Reading
Bad Lip Reading. This Pin was discovered by Liz Turner. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest. www.pinterest.nz
Michael Bublé Video Reply  Russian Unicorn [extra]
Michael Bublé Video Reply: Russian Unicorn [Extra] . © 2011 WMG Michael shares a special video reply for the "Russian Unicorn" — a bad lip reading of Michael Bublé (Watch it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... www.youtube.com
We Could Shoot A Russian Unicorn
We could shoot a Russian unicorn ."I got a porcupine called 'Zazoom' He leaves his scent on people's graves." -- "Russian Unicorn"You know the Kuleshov Effect, illustrated by the famous Soviet montage experiment in which an actor's performance seems to change, depending on whatever image (a bowl of soup, a child in a casket, a beautiful woman) appears before identical footage of his face in close-up. Performances in the movies only begin with what the actor does on the set. They are created and re-created every step of the way, from editing to final sound design and mixing (effects, looping, punching, music, etc.). There's also what I would propose we call the "Russian Unicorn Effect," after the amazing music video parody by Bad Lip Reading.OK, it's already kind of got a name -- the McGurk effect -- and it was "discovered" in 1976 by cognitive psychologist Harry McGurk and his research assistant John MacDonald -- and it explains how sounds can change perceptions of images and vice-versa.I saw and heard the parody above ("Russian Unicorn") a few months ago, which led me to check out the original Michael Bublé video ("Haven't Met You Yet"), below. I could not believe the difference. Try it yourself -- first the parody, then the original here (embedding disabled, unfortunately). www.rogerebert.com

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